Mosquito Myths & Misconceptions

mosquitos-mythsThere is no scientific evidence that eating or drinking any particular food (e.g.
bananas, garlic) can reduce the likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes.

There is no scientific evidence that taking vitamin B will reduce the likelihood of, or lessen the severity of an individual’s reaction to, a mosquito bite.

Mosquitoes cannot transmit HIV or other disease-causing viruses other than specific mosquito-borne viruses.

Blood type and skin colour are generally not good predictors of the likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes.

Any activity (e.g. exercise) that increases body temperature or causes sweating may increase the risk of being bitten by mosquitoes.

Studies have indicated that pregnant women may be more likely to be bitten by mosquitoes due to increased body temperature.

Studies have shown that the consumption of alcohol may increase the risk of being bitten by a mosquito due to increased body temperature (and perhaps failure to reapply repellent).

While there will always be community and media interest in why mosquitoes appear to bite some individuals more than others, the reality is that everyone is susceptible to mosquito bites and it only take one bite for the potential transmission of disease-causing pathogens.

The use of Ozzie Mozzie mosquito repellent will reduce the likelihood of being bitten and allow for a work or holiday free from worry.


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